Archive for the ‘18th century’ Category

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Slug Industries: Long John Silver

December 17, 2017

Something a bit different this time. I haven’t done a plug for an upcoming product in ages, but when Phil from Slug Industries (who is a nice bloke with a glorious moustache) showed me this upcoming pirate sculpt, I figured it was definitely worth sharing.

Long John Silver sculpt

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Long John Silver sculpt

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Based on Robert Newton’s iconic Long John Silver (fun fact: our “arrrr that be how them pirates be talking” tropes come from that performance), this is a wonderful Paul Hicks sculpt. It’s a great likeness, and one of the nicest pirate minis I’ve seen in recent years. It will be a part of Slug Industries’ 2018 Kickstarter, and I’m looking forward to adding it to my collection. He’ll be my third pirate with a crutch, speaking of the enduring legacy of R. L. Stevenson’s classic Treasure Island.

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Turtle Rock

December 7, 2017

With my dissertation turned in for now, I finally have more time and resources to devote to blogging. I have plenty of stuff that I’ve managed to finish during long evenings, so expect to see them here in the future – starting right now. I’ll be using some cell phone shots in these posts, as I’ve been shooting them along the way.

Caves and pirates go together like any two things that go together well, so I was immediately sold when I picked up a suitable looking piece of terrarium decoration for 10€ at the local pet store. A hefty (hollow) chunk of resin, and as you can see from the photo below, pretty much ready to use as is.

Pirate cave

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To match it with the rest of my terrain, I went to work. I repainted the cave, added a bunch of tufts and a bit of plastic Ikea plant, and here’s the end result:

Pirate cave

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Here’s the cave shown in its natural environment and much more yellow lighting, with my night watchman exploring. Smugglers, pirates, monsters? Certain doom, anyway.

Pirate cave exploring

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I have to say I love little stuff like this. It’s cheap, it’s easy, it’s good fun and it’s effective on the table. A cave is a simple enough feature that it will easily find use regardless of setting: add a troll, and it’s a trollcave, add in a few crates and it’s a smugglers’ hideout. Easy-peasy! The cave was dubbed Turtle Rock on a Facebook group I frequent, and the name stuck. It looks like a turtle and was originally intended for a terrarium setup, so I’m fine with it. I’ll be keeping an eye out in the future for terrarium bits, as they usually lack the seaweeds etc often crafted onto aquarium pieces. This piece was from a company called Exo Terra, but I’m sure there are tons of alternatives out there!

 

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From the painting desk #57 – Headless Horseman

November 6, 2017

While my little hollow on the internet has been a bit sleepy, I’ve nonetheless been working on things. We recently had our now-traditional Halloween game, and I finally finished the Headless Horseman miniature that I originally intended for the Halloween game of 2015. Better late than never, I’d say.

Picture of headless horseman miniature

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Picture of headless horseman miniature

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It isn’t much of a paintjob – I’m not a fan of painting black, and he was black, black, black. Being in a rush didn’t help things either! As usual for my Halloween games, I was painting him on the afternoon of the game day. To make up for the somewhat lacklustre painting, I put a bit of extra effort in the base, which I think improves him overall. I thought about doing some sort of ghostly effect on him, but decided against it in the end. A part of the Sleepy Hollow thing is that there’s always the chance it’s just someone pulling a prank, so I wanted to leave that in there.

The miniature is a decapitated British Legion Trooper from Front Rank’s American War of Independence range, coupled with one of Front Rank’s rearing horses. While I’m not completely happy with him, he does look the part of the Horseman, so I count that as a success.

Here are a few shots of the Horseman in action, the game was good fun! Photos by my friend Mia.

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Headless horseman miniature

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Jolly good!

October 14, 2017

This is another quick piece I finished some time ago. Whether pirates or redcoats, you can’t stay on your ship all the time, so you’ll need a boat to reach the shore.

It’s a Playmobil boat that came with a larger ship I bought. I’d been meaning to make something out of it, but it just kept slipping to the back of the queue until one day I just happened to pick it up and finished it fairly quickly. After chopping off all the Playmobiley bits and making a new deck from cardboard, I added planking from coffee stirrers. I then put in a small swivel gun I picked up as part of a pirate lot earlier this year, and…that’s it, actually. Nice and simple.

The finished jolly boat looks quite decent and comfortably fits six miniatures on 28mm bases. I kept the style very neutral, so it works equally well with pirates and more legitimate types.

Picture of a playmobil jolly boat

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Picture of pirates in boat

The pirate queen makes her landing

Picture of boat with soldiers

Captain Pemberton-Smythe and his troopers accompany the governor

I’m currently working on my new gameboard that has plenty of shoreline, so this boat will definitely see use, and I’ll likely get a few more. Maybe I’ll be able to recreate this wonderful scene from Black Sails:

 

 

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Bark bark bark

October 12, 2017

It’s terrain time! Lately I’ve been working on a variety of fairly low intensity scenery builds – pretty much things I can work on while watching Killjoys and The Expanse.

I picked up the idea for these somewhere online, as these things happen. Someone had used bark to make rocky outcrops, and as I was about to head to our summer place, I figured I’d pick some up and give it a try. Pine bark is plentiful in Finland, and after a few days without rain it was easy to gather up more than enough dry pieces.

The whole process was delightfully simple. I chucked the bark pieces into the oven for a 20-30 minute bake at 200°C. This not only dried them out and got rid of all sorts of teeny tiny little critters, but it also gave my apartment a lovely wood-fired sauna smell.

I glued the pieces to large oval mdf bases I picked up at a local convention, and went to work. After sealing the bark with watered-down PVA, I started painting them. Using mainly cheap craft acrylics, I first painted the pieces black, and then followed it up with progressively lighter shades of grey, drybrushed on, up to pure white. A quick Agrax Earthshade wash followed, as well as a few licks of green wash here and there.

Before and after

Finishing touches were done by adding in a variety of decorative stones, sand, tufts and shrubs, some undergrowth cut from an Ikea plastic plant and static grass. The end result is…surprisingly nice! I feel these just might be some of the nicest scenery bits I’ve ever produced. I snuck in a secret hatch in one of the pieces, made out of coffee stirrers. An old, battered hatch hidden in the bushes under a rocky outcrop – it just screams “pirate” or “smuggler” to me.

Rocky outcrop made from bark

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Rocky outcrop made from bark

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Rocky outcrop made from bark

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Hidden hatch under a bark rock

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Captain Pemberton-Smythe leads his men on a hunt for pirates

A special mention goes out to Tajima1 Miniatures, who manufacture wonderful tufts and shrubs for miniatures. Fellow blogger Paul of sho3box fame somewhat gushingly recommended these to me, so I decided to give them a try. I’m happy I did! They’re the first tufts I’ve tried that actually live up to the claim of being self-adhesive, and they look lovely to boot. I’ll definitely be using plenty of these.

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Diana and me

August 20, 2017

It’s my birthday today, and I got a wonderful present a day early. Emmi had booked us a two hour coastal cruise on Diana, a reconstructed late 18th century cannon sloop that sails from Suomenlinna. It was super fun, with the crew dressed in period clothing and in character, with the main actor playing the part of Swedish shipbuilder and scientist, vice admiral Fredrik Henrik af Chapman. Now, this sort of thing can be cheesy and awkward, but I’m happy to report that it wasn’t – the crew played their parts well, the dialogue was witty and funny and they managed to cram a lot of historical information in there as well. The passengers got to help with some of the easy tasks in hoisting and lowering sails, and we got to try our hand in rowing the ship as well. There was also flag signaling and teaching of maritime knots as an additional bonus.

The cannon sloop (or gun sloop) was a type of small vessel designed in the latter half of the 18th century. From Wikipedia:

A gun sloop (Sw. kanonslup) had two collapsible masts and carried chase guns in both bow and stern. They were 15 to 19 meters in length and 3.5 – 4 meters in width while having draft of slightly less than one meter. The sloops had 10 to 12 oar pairs with two men on each oar and two collapsible sloop-rigged masts. Armament consisted of a 12 or 24-pound gun at both bow and stern, though some of the first gun sloops carried only a single gun in the bow, and a single 3-pounder swivel gun on each side. Some sloops carried carriages to allow their guns to be used as a shore battery. When not in combat, the guns were secured at the bottom of the vessel. Crew complement was from 50 to 64 men.

While not exactly a pirate vessel, it definitely gave me a lot of perspective on ship size. I’ve always thought many miniature gaming ships much too small, but they actually seem to be quite accurate! I might need to buy a few for shoreline duty and dedicate the two bigger ships to boarding action scenarios – knowledge can be an expensive thing. Anyway, here are some photos of the cruise, you can click for larger versions. Also, Emmi reminded me to write that she’s the best – she most definitely is.

 

 

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From the painting desk #55 – Big guns

July 21, 2017

A special double feature this time, somewhat shoehorned into matching a theme! So, big guns it is! Sadly, there’s no sexual innuendo here, nor is it an AC/DC reference. Instead there are just two big guns and a rambling intro.

Click for a larger version

First up is a cabin boy from North Star. That’s not even a very big gun, except in relation to his tiny frame. This was a quick mini to paint and fairly fun to boot – although poses with anything lifted in front of the face are usually a bit irritating. The model also had a really unfortunate mould line running through his hair, and I couldn’t get it out entirely as I didn’t want to destroy the hair texture.

I figured that the cabin boy would be a little runt with little respect shown to him. That meant no fancy clothes, although he appears to have been given a mighty fine pistol – or maybe it’s just something for him to play around with, with no powder or shot? Or maybe, just maybe there’s action going on and all hands on board are needed.

Small minis are quite fan to paint, on account of being, well, small. Very little surface to paint, and with no fiddly details, excessive pouches or suchlike, this was a delightfully easy paint. I’m quite happy with him.

Click for a larger version

The second one is a highwayman by Outpost. I loved, loved, loved painting this one and I like to think it shows. You know how sometimes everything just seems to click, the mini is a joy to paint and you pretty much get everything right on the first go? It happened with this one, and I think it resulted in one of the nicest pieces I’ve painted this year.

I kept the palette simple, with the red scarf and exposed skin acting as focal points in an otherwise muted mini. He wields a blunderbuss – an early form of shotgun that for some reason I can’t articulate is one of my all-time favourite weapons – so definitely fits the big guns theme. The sculpt is nice and clean and lends itself well to painting. If you’re into the genre, I definitely suggest picking up some minis from Outpost.

While originally a highwayman, I intend to use the character as a lackey of the merchant shown in the previous post. Just like with the governor’s henchman, the distinct look of long coat, raised collar and tricorne hat gives out a nice, faceless menacing feel perfect for hired thugs.

They bring this year’s painting count up to 14.

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