Posts Tagged ‘West Wind’

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Blood Bowl-a-rama #13 – Repainting for nothing

April 18, 2012

A few days ago I did something I don’t usually do: a slight repaint on one of my models.

I had this werewolf from West Wind, who I originally painted for my Underworld project (now sadly defunct), and happened to need another werewolf for my Blood Bowl team, the Drakwald Ravens.

Click for a larger version

A quick pant and base repaint later, I had a new player, Anti-Christian Wolff. Apart from the base and the pants, I didn’t change the model and the differences apparent are due to photography. This repaint was actually a step back, due to my decision to not highlight the black on the Ravens’ uniform. It does make for a sleek, sporty wolf though.

Click for a larger version

Anti-Christian’s debut started out pretty impressive, as he scored what proved to be a winning 2-1 goal against the crafty bourgeoisie dwarves of Blackpit Arsenal. A few turns later a disastrous sequence of dice rolls meant that poor Anti-Christian dropped dead – from heart failure due to the elation from the goal, we concluded.

That’s Blood Bowl for you.

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Blood Bowl-a-rama #10 – an unkindness of Ravens

February 1, 2012

Did you know, that a flock of ravens is actually called an “unkindness”? Really! Read a column on the subject here.

Anyway, this curious piece of linguistics brings me to the main point of this post – namely my completed Blood Bowl team. There are a few extra models, and I have one werewolf pending a repaint. Other than that, here are the Drakwald Ravens in their gothic glory.

Click for a larger version

As you may have noticed, there are some players in the photo that haven’t been introduced yet. They are:

Arthur Schopenhowler the werewolf. I simply love this model from West Wind, see the review here.

Click for a larger version

A man can be himself only so long as he is alone. 

– Schopenhowler

Jürgen Habermassacre the flesh golem. The model’s a tank zombie from the FU-UK sculpting competition a few years back.

Click for a larger version

 One never really knows who one’s enemy is. 

– Habermassacre

Georg Henrik von Wight the..wight. The model is a custom build from GW plastic parts.

Click for a larger version

If one is satisfied with things, one doesn’t complain about the downsides that exist, either. 

– Von Wight

There you go! An actual, completed project. Should I need another werewolf, I’ll simply give the pants and base of a previously painted West Wind critter a quick repaint.

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From the painting desk #10

February 12, 2011

I’ve gotten some painting done after a while, here are my two latest.

The first one is a werewolf from West Wind (see the review). A very simple, down to earth paintjob, but I think he came out pretty fine. It’s been a good while since I added stuff to my Underworld project, so maybe I’ll eventually finish that, after all.

Click for a larger version

The second one is a Horrorclix Alien repaint. Since the Aliens are based on the dire AvP movie, there are a few miniatures that are attached to scenery elements, such as columns or walls. The old stone wall didn’t really suit my Aliens, so I slapped some old bits and pieces on it, covered it with loads of greenstuff, painted it to match my Aliens and smeared some glue over it for that creepy slime look. I think the matt wall works nicely with the glossy Alien, and I’m quite happy with the way the whole thing turned out. A lot of GS went into it, though! There’s a before/after shot below, although It’s not the same model obviously. I’ve photoshopped the Alien on the right a bit, since black is a real bastard to photo.

Before/after. Click for a larger version.

Comments more than welcome, as always!

 

 

 

 

 

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Werewolves by West Wind – a review

February 20, 2010

My review of the Reaper werewolves is one of the most read articles on Dawn of the Lead, which would suggest that there is an interest in werewolf miniatures. Another thing leading me down that track is the fact that I have a bunch. It’s time to put three of those under the looking glass and see what some of West Wind Productions’ lycanthropes are all about. Two of them are from West Wind’s Secrets of the Third Reich WWW2 (Weird World War 2) line. The line includes all sorts of fun things, with nazi zombies, vampires and the like adding to the chaos of war. The line has several werewolves, and I bought a few for use in my Underworld miniature project. The third one comes from West Wind’s Gothic Horror range.

All sculpts were very nice, and almost completely devoid of flash or mould lining. Big thumbs up to West Wind for this, since cleaning up bad casts is one of the aspects of this hobby that I hate.

Jager Werewolf “Wolfgang” looks vicious. His head is tilted up and his teeth are bared. His posture suggests that he’s either going through a painful transformation or simply howling at the sky in fury. His pants are torn and his whole upper body is bare. I really like this model except for one thing – and this holds true for all the WW werewolves reviewed here. The model has lost one finger and two toes in the transformation process. While I’ve no qualms about the shapeshifting altering the number of digits, the three-toed feet look birdlike. Combined with an almost scaly texture, Wolfie and his buddies look like they’re walking around on chicken feet. Other than this, he’s a wonderful wolfman. Wolfgang comes with a round 25mm slottabase, and is sculpted by Andy Cooper.

Wolfgang

Click for a larger view

Jager Werewolf “Mondheulen” translates smoothly as Moonhowler. Whereas Wolfgang looks very much like a wolf, Mondheulen looks like a werewolf in mid-transformation. His face/snout is almost rat- or bat-like, a little bit like this fellow or his friend. His proportions are weirdish, with an improbably slender waist and long limbs.  These don’t really bother me at all, but simply add to his menacing presence instead. Mondheulen looks very bestial and bloodthirsty, and his pose suggests he’s charging after some unfortunate victim. Like Wolfgang, Mondheulen has torn pants and chicken feet. Doesn’t mean I don’t love him, bless his little heart. Sculpting and basing as above.

Mondheulen

Click for a larger view

As the comparison pic below shows, the two werewolves are slightly larger than your average 28mm humans, making them just a bit more intimidating.

Jager size comparison

From left to right: Foundry, West Wind, Hasslefree, West Wind

Loup Garou (Great Werewolf) is a solid chunk of metal. He’s as big as the Reaper ones and even bulkier, a big beast. He’s a multi part casting, with the arms and the head being separate components. The parts fit well enough, but you’ll have to fill in gaps with greenstuff if you want a smooth finish. The werewolf itself looks pretty nice – again apart from the notorious feet (how hard could it have been to google some info on the subject?) He’s reaching forward with his left arm and his face is locked in a ferocious snarl. In my opinion it’s not quite as good a model as the Reaper ones, but comes close enough to be lovely nonetheless. The Loup Garou comes on a fairly thin integral metal base, and I unfortunately have no idea about the sculptor. If some reader knows this, do drop a comment. (Note: Thanks to reader Joel, I found out that this one – and apparently all of West Wind’s stuff  – is also by Andy Cooper. Thanks!)

Loup Garou

Click for a larger view

Loup Garou size comparison

From left to right: Foundry, West Wind, Hasslefree, Reaper

All the models are available through the West Wind Productions online store. The Loup Garou retails at £5.00 and the Jager werewolves at £4.00 each. This isn’t that bad a price for quality models, so I had no qualms about paying, even if £13.00 for three models sounds a bit steep.

Overall verdict: The West Wind werewolves are well worth buying. While they’re not quite as good as Reaper’s offerings, and if the chicken feet don’t put you off, you have some nice wolfmen in dynamic poses, and that’s always a good thing, isn’t it? Also, the Loup Garou is large enough to become a centrepiece model, if you put some time and effort in his painting and basing. All in all, these are a fine offering and well worth adding to your collection.

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Fangs, fur, fashion and firearms

July 26, 2009

There comes a time in every man’s life, when the zombies of childhood must be left behind. I’ve finally taken that step and am now completely over my foolish zombie infatuation. No, not really. I’ve just recently taken something of a detour to visit another dear old friend of mine, also in the genre of modern horror. Vampires and werewolves, that is.

Lately I watched the first two Underworld and Blade movies, which are chock-full of cool, stylized battles between vampires, werewolves and humans. How could I not want to game – or at least collect – something similar? Now, I already have a lot of models suitable for modern horror games which is no wonder considering my love for zombies. The cops, SWAT teams, bikers, military types and such easily fill the role of humans. But what about the vampires and the werewolves? That’s where I’m lacking, at least until the next two weeks at least when I start receiving the €70 worth of minis from various manufacturers that I’ve ordered.

To those of you that might be interested, here are my picks. All images are © of their respective companies, used without permission and will be taken down on request. Click on the images to be transported to the manufacturers’ pages.

Vampires – I wanted to capture the look and feel of Underworld’s vampires. Stylistically they’re lifted almost 1:1 from White Wolf’s Vampire: the Masquerade game (which even lead to a legal dispute), meaning that they are the embodiments of modern-goth cool. Long coats, leather clothing and black, a lot of it. What makes modern vampires so easy for the collector is that unless you want to give your vampires a feral look, you can simply buy any modern figures you like and just give them a very pale complexion. The image below is a prime example, click for a larger version.

UnderworldTableA

Again, luckily, such models are easy to find. Here’s what I picked for my games:

kat 2

Click to go to Hasslefree Miniatures

Kat by Hasslefree miniatures was a natural choice for me. She has it all, with the tight clothing, pistol and a touch of the archaic brought by the sword. One could almost imagine she was sculpted for such a purpose, but that’s pure speculation of course. Kat is a beautiful sculpt, and one of my all-time favourite models.

Click to go to Heresy Miniatures

Click to go to Heresy Miniatures

Cartwheel from Heresy’s scifi range was my next choice. The somewhat crazy firing-while-cartwheeling pose fits the genre perfectly, as do the tall boots, the bald head, the shades and the long coat.

Click to go to HeroClix Wikipedia entry

Click to go to HeroClix Wikipedia entry

Ultimates Hawkeye is a somewhat surprising entry from the currently defunct HeroClix line. While the model isn’t the most detailed, the combination of dynamic pose, modern bow and skintight clothing justify his repainting as a vampire. Update 28.9.2009: HeroClix and HorrorClix are apparently making a comeback under a new company.

Click to go to Foundry

Click to go to Foundry

With the previous three comprising my characters, I still needed some lesser vampires to provide some support. Along comes Foundry, with their Hired Hitmen pack. With their trenchcoats and modern weaponry, they fit the bill just fine.

Click to go to Reaper Miniatures

Click to go to Reaper Miniatures

Vampire spawn from Reaper topped off my vampire selection. I bought these in case I needed some more feral vampires, and simply because they’re wonderful sculpts. They’re also useful if I want to play some period vampire games, as their look makes them suitable for several different time periods.

Werewolves – I wanted something a bit more unrefined. Compared to vampires, werewolves are often portrayed as strong brutes of the working class, whereas vampires are all about elegance and aristocracy. With this in mind, I went off looking for miniatures that in their human form were fairly everyday, and not uniform in their looks as well as armed lightly compared to the vampires. However, in their wolf forms I wanted them to be big and imposing. See below for the imagery I was after.

Underworld werewolf in human form

Underworld werewolf

I had a fairly good idea where to start looking, and as with the vampires, I ended up using miniatures from only a few different manufacturers.

Click to go to Hasslefree Miniatures

Click to go to Hasslefree Miniatures

Click to go to Hasslefree Miniatures

Click to go to Hasslefree Miniatures

Click to go to Hasslefree Miniatures

Click to go to Hasslefree Miniatures

Harby, Kendra and Zombie-hunter Kev are all from Hasslefree. Harby will undoubtedly become the leader of my werewolves, being the large, imposing and brutal looking guy that he is. Kendra and Kev are normal looking people with handguns, which is exactly what I was after. The fact that both of the men carry very heavy pistols is an added bonus. There’s nothing like a Desert Eagle shot to the face to keep a vampire down.

Click to go to Heresy Miniatures

Click to go to Heresy Miniatures

Click to go to Heresy Miniatures

Click to go to Heresy Miniatures

Security officers Hawque and Dove from Heresy were picked for the same reason as the previous ones. They have mundane clothing and are packing handguns. There’s a variety of different pistols to choose from, with some being more scifi than others.

Click to go to Foundry

Click to go to Foundry

I happened to have Gideon from Foundry’s Doc Friday’s Yardies pack lying around, and decided to add him to the fold as well. The model is absolutely massive, towering head and shoulders above many 28mm miniatures. The large mane of dreadlocks gives something of a wild, hairy appearance which is perfect for a werewolf. The only downside is that he carries a rocket launcher in addition to his assault rifle, and I’m thinking of using some greenstuff to convert the launcher into a duffel bag.

That’s it for the human forms, but what about the real meat of the things, the wolf-forms themselves? It was clear to me from the start that I wasn’t going to go for  Lon Chaney style Wolfmen, but wanted large slavering wolfbeasts instead. This is what I ended up picking for my force:

Click to go to Reaper Miniatures

Click to go to Reaper Miniatures

Click to go to Reaper Miniatures

Click to go to Reaper Miniatures

Jean Paul Werewolf and Male Were Wolf (consistent, no?) from Reaper were easy picks. They’re wonderful sculpt of suitably vicious looking werewolves. I like the exaggerated claws and proportions as well.

Click to go to West Wind Productions

Click to go to West Wind Productions

Click to go to West Wind Productions

Click to go to West Wind Productions

Click to go to West Wind Productions

Click to go to West Wind Productions

I was happy to find that I could actually pick up the rest of my werewolves (to complete the original group of five that I had in mind) from West Wind. They have a few suitable ranges and a good variety of all sorts of werecreatures. Loup Garou, Wolfgang and Mondheulen all share a vicious look, with Mondheulen looking especially bloodthirsty.

And that’s it! Two groups of magical creatures ready to do battle with each other and any humans that happen to get stuck in the middle. After they are finished, I would love to get me a few champion types for both sides. For the vampires, Heresy’s Vampire in Bat Form is a wonderful model, and to fight him, the Warwolf from the nowadays defunct(?) Ilyad games is pretty much the best you can get. At €20 for one model, it should be. The Warwolf can be found by googling, and is still stocked by some retailers.

Click to go to Heresy Miniatures

Click to go to Heresy Miniatures

The sadly OOP(?) Warwolf

The sadly OOP(?) Warwolf

…but I’ll look into these after a year or five, when I’m actually close to completing this project. Luckily it’s not the destination that matters, but the road that leads to it.

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