Archive for the ‘Miniatures’ Category

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From the painting desk #58 – Long John Silver

March 31, 2018

I’m not much for the whole yarrrrrrrrrrr thing, but I’ll make an exception here. A while back I previewed a lovely pirate from Slug Industries – Long John Silver as portrayed by Robert Newton. Phil who runs Slug Industries was kind enough to send me one of the resin masters for painting. It’s a great mini and painted up wonderfully. I had a wonderful time with the parrot and everything. I did my best to recreate the five o’clock shadow and the ruddiness of his cheeks, and I’m quite happy with how they turned out.

Long John Silver by Slug Industries

Click for a larger version

I should note that the eyes weren’t botched, I was going for this look that is outrageously cartoony for an actual human being:

The miniature in question is currently available through Slug Industries’ The Sailboat Malarkey Kickstarter! I should mention that there is no commercial transaction involved here, Phil who is running the KS is a personal friend that I’ve gotten to know through internet forums and Salute visits, so I’m quite happy to advertise it without any special incentive. I helped Phil out on the KS by taking the comparison photo of various manufacturers’ pirate minis alongside Long John that you can see on the Kickstarter site.

As it happens, I’ve been promised an extra, unpainted Long John Silver model by Phil to give out to a lucky reader of this humble blog. Let me know in the comments if you want to take part in the raffle – I’ll pick a winner at random next Sunday (April 8) and we can sort out delivery after that. Even if you don’t luck out on that, there’s always the Kickstarter.

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Piratical 2017 recap

January 6, 2018

This year has been a weird one hobby-wise. On one hand, I must have painted less than 20 miniatures all year, which is very few even by my modest output standards. On the other hand, I’ve been fairly prolific with terrain – building a whole new pirate board for example. To showcase what I’ve done this year, I set up most of my pirate stuff on my new board for a major photo shoot. To be honest, this is what I’m mostly in the hobby for: I game very little, so the pirate project is more of a dollhouse thing than something for frequent gaming use. I think this goes back to old Citadel Journals, where dioramas with tens of minis were used to display the variety of miniatures available. Another, more recent example and a great inspiration has been the pirate gallery on War in 15mm.

The table has many items that I haven’t featured in dedicated posts. If there’s something that catches your eye, just let me know in the comments and I’ll do a separate post. There will be one on the table itself, too!

My pirates have become by far my most enduring and consistent project of the past years. I’ve stuck almost exclusively to them since 2015, and there’s been no drop in enthusiasm. On the contrary, I’m more and more interested in the 18th century (and there has been a bit of an overspill into 17th and 19th century too) and I’ve for example amassed quite the collection of books on the subject. Might be a post or two in those, too.

You can click on any photo for a larger version, opening in a new tab.

The governor and his family survey the town

A wealthy merchant with his bodyguard in tow – a highwayman lurks behind the turn

One of the governor’s footmen keeps an eye on the pirates making landfall

A scoundrel with a heart or an assassin?

A boatload of pirates lands on the jetty

Trouble might be brewing

It’s Jean Blanc – the Unkillable Frenchman!

The obeah woman and her maroons keep watch

A pirate is about to get hanged – is this what drew the Frenchman?

“Nasty business, hanging.”

The captain makes sure the king’s law is carried out

A few pirates got off with an easier sentence

On Tyburn Island, trade carries on

…even in the shadow of the gallows

Speaking of trade, the governor’s men have discovered a stash in a beach cave

A footman keeps watch as the cave is investigated

At least the weather’s nice

…unless you’re working

…let alone using the outhouse

Barrett’s dead drunk in the pigsty again

“Need a hand wi’ ‘im Peg?”

Old Rogers’ cart is a landmark by now

Whatever happens on the island, the Queen knows about it

So, that’s where I’m at now! Feedback is most welcome. To all new readers and regulars, happy 2018 and thanks for stopping by!

 

 

 

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Slug Industries: Long John Silver

December 17, 2017

Something a bit different this time. I haven’t done a plug for an upcoming product in ages, but when Phil from Slug Industries (who is a nice bloke with a glorious moustache) showed me this upcoming pirate sculpt, I figured it was definitely worth sharing.

Long John Silver sculpt

Click for a larger version

Long John Silver sculpt

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Based on Robert Newton’s iconic Long John Silver (fun fact: our “arrrr that be how them pirates be talking” tropes come from that performance), this is a wonderful Paul Hicks sculpt. It’s a great likeness, and one of the nicest pirate minis I’ve seen in recent years. It will be a part of Slug Industries’ 2018 Kickstarter, and I’m looking forward to adding it to my collection. He’ll be my third pirate with a crutch, speaking of the enduring legacy of R. L. Stevenson’s classic Treasure Island.

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Turtle Rock

December 7, 2017

With my dissertation turned in for now, I finally have more time and resources to devote to blogging. I have plenty of stuff that I’ve managed to finish during long evenings, so expect to see them here in the future – starting right now. I’ll be using some cell phone shots in these posts, as I’ve been shooting them along the way.

Caves and pirates go together like any two things that go together well, so I was immediately sold when I picked up a suitable looking piece of terrarium decoration for 10€ at the local pet store. A hefty (hollow) chunk of resin, and as you can see from the photo below, pretty much ready to use as is.

Pirate cave

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To match it with the rest of my terrain, I went to work. I repainted the cave, added a bunch of tufts and a bit of plastic Ikea plant, and here’s the end result:

Pirate cave

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Here’s the cave shown in its natural environment and much more yellow lighting, with my night watchman exploring. Smugglers, pirates, monsters? Certain doom, anyway.

Pirate cave exploring

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I have to say I love little stuff like this. It’s cheap, it’s easy, it’s good fun and it’s effective on the table. A cave is a simple enough feature that it will easily find use regardless of setting: add a troll, and it’s a trollcave, add in a few crates and it’s a smugglers’ hideout. Easy-peasy! The cave was dubbed Turtle Rock on a Facebook group I frequent, and the name stuck. It looks like a turtle and was originally intended for a terrarium setup, so I’m fine with it. I’ll be keeping an eye out in the future for terrarium bits, as they usually lack the seaweeds etc often crafted onto aquarium pieces. This piece was from a company called Exo Terra, but I’m sure there are tons of alternatives out there!

 

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From the painting desk #57 – Headless Horseman

November 6, 2017

While my little hollow on the internet has been a bit sleepy, I’ve nonetheless been working on things. We recently had our now-traditional Halloween game, and I finally finished the Headless Horseman miniature that I originally intended for the Halloween game of 2015. Better late than never, I’d say.

Picture of headless horseman miniature

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Picture of headless horseman miniature

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It isn’t much of a paintjob – I’m not a fan of painting black, and he was black, black, black. Being in a rush didn’t help things either! As usual for my Halloween games, I was painting him on the afternoon of the game day. To make up for the somewhat lacklustre painting, I put a bit of extra effort in the base, which I think improves him overall. I thought about doing some sort of ghostly effect on him, but decided against it in the end. A part of the Sleepy Hollow thing is that there’s always the chance it’s just someone pulling a prank, so I wanted to leave that in there.

The miniature is a decapitated British Legion Trooper from Front Rank’s American War of Independence range, coupled with one of Front Rank’s rearing horses. While I’m not completely happy with him, he does look the part of the Horseman, so I count that as a success.

Here are a few shots of the Horseman in action, the game was good fun! Photos by my friend Mia.

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Headless horseman miniature

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Jolly good!

October 14, 2017

This is another quick piece I finished some time ago. Whether pirates or redcoats, you can’t stay on your ship all the time, so you’ll need a boat to reach the shore.

It’s a Playmobil boat that came with a larger ship I bought. I’d been meaning to make something out of it, but it just kept slipping to the back of the queue until one day I just happened to pick it up and finished it fairly quickly. After chopping off all the Playmobiley bits and making a new deck from cardboard, I added planking from coffee stirrers. I then put in a small swivel gun I picked up as part of a pirate lot earlier this year, and…that’s it, actually. Nice and simple.

The finished jolly boat looks quite decent and comfortably fits six miniatures on 28mm bases. I kept the style very neutral, so it works equally well with pirates and more legitimate types.

Picture of a playmobil jolly boat

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Picture of pirates in boat

The pirate queen makes her landing

Picture of boat with soldiers

Captain Pemberton-Smythe and his troopers accompany the governor

I’m currently working on my new gameboard that has plenty of shoreline, so this boat will definitely see use, and I’ll likely get a few more. Maybe I’ll be able to recreate this wonderful scene from Black Sails:

 

 

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From the painting desk #56 – Dragon

September 9, 2017

There comes a time, when we heed a certain call

and we finally pick up that dragon that we bought when we were 20 or so.

This awesome dragon has been sitting in my cupboard for years and years and years and years. I originally bought it way back when I was designing my own Reign of Fire inspired skirmish game of dragons vs. humans. As the movie was released in 2002, I assume that’s pretty much when the dragon was bought – meaning it has sat unpainted for 15 years. That’s the time it takes for a newborn baby to grow up and go through the Finnish public education system, or for a 20 year old, fresh out of high school geek living with their parents to become a 35 year old dissertation writing geek. Time flies, doesn’t it?

This was the result of yet another Random Platypus painting challenge, this time titled Old and mouldy. It was intended for people to finish pieces that have been mouldering away, so this was a perfect pick. It is a Reaper Miniatures dragon sculpted by Sandra Garrity, and should you want one, it’s still in production. I loved it back then, I love it now. The pose is dynamic and very dragon-y and makes the creature very imposing.

I don’t paint dragons very often, so I wanted to have fun with this one. I wanted to capture the feel of the old red box Dungeons & Dragons cover art by Larry Elmore, with the red dragon leaning over its piles of gold. I’m sure you’ve seen it.

I had originally based him on a 40mm square base, which was pitifully small. I had also propped him up with a piece of wire. Those had to go, as I wanted a more impressive base. A I was documenting the process for the forum painting challenge, here is a before-and-after photo.

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The new base was a car mount for a cell phone holder – you can still make out the Nokia text in the centre. I had kept it lying around for ages, as you tend to do with stuff like this, in case it’s ever useful. The original store photos show the dragon leaning back on its tail, which I didn’t like. That’s probably why I propped it up with the wire originally. As I wanted to get rid of the wire, I had to gently bend the dragon forward to bring the balance up a bit. Once I’d done this, I pinned it to the base and secured it with ProCreate putty (not shown in the photo).

Painting the dragon was a fairly straightforward process. I knew that my patience for such a large piece would be limited, so I just washed and drybrushed away for the most part. I did do some layering on the belly, claws and teeth, but this was definitely not very delicate painting. The sculpt however is very forgiving, and I’m very pleased with the look.

Click for a larger version

Click for a larger version

Obviously the dragon needed treasure. I built small mounds out of ProCreate to represent piles of treasure, and sculpted in a bit of stonework to depict a dungeon floor. The treasure is painted ballast with some decorative jewel beads and painted over with cheap glitter nail polish – I definitely recommend both if you’re ever making miniature treasure stuff!

Click for a larger version

There you have it! A dragon to look nice in my glass cabinet and hopefully to terrorize adventurers in years to come. It would only be fitting for him to actually make it to a game of Dungeons & Dragons, so dear GM, if you’re reading this…

Things have been quiet on the blog front lately, as I’m doing some home renovation stuff and that’s taking up a big part of my time. I’ve still been plodding away at miniatures stuff, so hopefully I can show some of those soon.

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