Posts Tagged ‘Recreational Conflict’

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From the painting desk #9

January 5, 2011

I’ve really gotten the new year started with a bang when it comes to painting. I’m churning out painted stuff at the rate of a mini or two per day, which is approximately 300 times my normal rate. I’m especially happy about the fact that I’m getting back to my old projects, resurrecting them (especially the zombies, ba-dum-tchhh) and finally getting miniatures I’ve bought years ago painted.

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It’s another one of Mark Copplestone’s wonderful Predators, available from Copplestone Castings. A sweet mini and paints up nicely as Mr. Copplestone’s sculpts tend to. For more info, check out my Predator review.

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I  bought my Studio Miniatures zombies ages ago, and have only now gotten into painting them. They’re really very, very nice minis with a lot of character and it’s an easy job making them look fine on the tabletop.

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The world is often a dangerous place for little choirboys, and the zombie apocalypse makes it no different. This unfortunate victim is from Recreational Conflict. Zombie children, gotta love ’em!

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From the painting desk #8

December 31, 2010

This post will have the massive honour of being my last post this year. I’ve been painting a bit lately, and it’s time to show what I’ve been up to.

First up is a zombie from Mega Miniatures. Nothing fancy. The model had been on my desk for ages, so I spent an hour or so to get him off the desk and into the cabinet. A very simple paintjob, and I love going to town with the blood spray effect, which I think makes the sledgehammer even more brutal.

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The next one is a zombie punk rocker from Recreational Conflict (go here for my review). I put some more work into her, and I think it shows. The presence of The Disciple inspired me to use some of my understandably less used paints, and I think they really made the punk rock look work.

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There’s a bit of a Warmachine fever sweeping our gaming group, and yes, it appears I’m getting into a new game system. What can you do, the models are just too lovely. I picked Khador as my faction of choice, as I really love their visual style. I’d also previously bought some Khador widowmakers to use as engineers/champions in my WHFB Empire army. They went into their originally intended service instead, and here’s the first of them painted. I think he came out pretty nice. I have to mention though, that bleedin’ steampunk basically means straps, straps, buckles, piping and straps. All of which are a pain to paint. Can’t have everything, I guess.

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With these I’d like to wish you all a happy new year! Keep painting, gaming, blogging and spending indecent amounts of money on miniatures and assorted largely useless paraphernalia. I know I will.

 

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My zombie horde

March 1, 2010

For a zombie blogger and miniatures collector, I have surprisingly few painted zombies, only around 50 or so. Since I was asked to show more of my painted stuff, I figured I’d put up my horde along with some closeups of my favourites.

Here’s my “horde” in full. 50+ models don’t look like much, do they? At the moment they’re a mix of  GW plastic zombies, GW plastic Catachans, Mega Miniatures, Recreational Conflict, Ral Partha and Copplestone Castings. Additionally there’s one model each from Heroquest, GW Imperial Guard, Warzone, HorrorClix, and HeroClix.

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I already showed some of my favourites in the post on GW plastic conversions, but there are others as well. Here’s a selection:

The Zombie Patient is a repaint of a HorrorClix model. It’s quite an improvement, don’t you think? Sorry for the horrible quality on the comparison original, I had to snatch it from an older pic and resize it. The promotion picture for the model was far better looking than what I received. Also note the change in lighting. White daylight bulb on the left.

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Zombie Kids are always fun and creepy. The following three are all from Mega Miniatures. The freehand on all models rather shows that I’m not really that focused on neat painting on zombies, they’re very much test pieces to try stuff on. These ended up looking nice enough for the tabletop, though.

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The Chewed Up Shambler from Recreational Conflict is a nice model. I usually give my zombies fast, rough paintjobs and it shows. Here, however, I wanted to try and paint a zombie to the standard that I use on other models, and I’m very happy with the result. If I only had the time and patience to do this on all zombies!

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The Classic is an old Grenadier mini – still available through Mirliton – from the 80s, making it probably as old young as I am. I started my gaming with Dungeons & Dragons (or actually Miekka ja Magia, the first Finnish RPG, which was basically a simplified D&D) with my big brothers, and this also introduced me to miniatures. This Frankensteiny zombie dates back to those days, and it was a moment of great nostalgy for me to paint him. The model show its age, but is still one of my favourites.

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The Neo-Nazi is a conversion based on a HeroClix thug, with a GW zombie hand and head, and the other arm cut off. Simple, characterful and effective in my opinion.

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The Rambo is a GW Catachan jungle fighter. The left leg has been cut up and repositioned and the head glued on in a zombie-ish angle. The hanging left arm adds to the effect. The right wrist that he’s missing was used in the soldier zombie conversion shown in the previous post. This model is a nice example of how simple it’s to make zombies out of other models, especially if they’re plastic. With very little work you could transform a full box of plastic troopers into zombies with limb repositioning.

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The Officer is a metal GW Imperial Guard model from the Last Chancers box set. The left hand was holding a massive weapon, so I cut the wrist off and replaced it with a plastic one from the Catachan set. The model ended up looking like it’s reaching for someone, and the bandages and torn clothing only enhance the zombie appearance. The Officer is another example of a zombie that I spent a bit more time painting as I liked the model too much to just give him a basic zombie slap-on.

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The Jogger and The Beach Bum are my own sculpts, so I naturally gave them more attention than my usual zombie fare. While the sculpts aren’t that great, I think they look very nice painted and certainly don’t look out of place in my horde. The feeling of painting metal that you’ve sculpted yourself, man that was cool.

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Click for a larger version

I’ve got plenty more to paint, and I’m slowly starting to attack my backlog. Anyway, here’s what I have managed to do so far. I’d be happy to hear your comments, as usual.

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Zombies by Recreational Conflict – a review

June 6, 2009

I can’t remember how I ran into Recreational Conflict. Maybe they were listed in some forum discussion, maybe I was just googling for zombie miniatures, I’ve no idea. However, I’m happy I did.

The last few weeks have been pure zombie miniature goodness for me. Not only did I buy the Studio Miniatures zombies which probably are the best on the market (for reviews, see here and here, they already said the same things I would), but followed it up with Recreational Conflicts’ miniatures which aren’t far behind.

Recreational Conflict sells 8 different zombies in their Lead Bones range, all of them sculpted by Brian Cooke. The models span a wide range of concepts, and will add a nice touch of variety to your zombie horde.

Model #1 – Chewed Up Shambler is a fairly generic modern male zombie. He has a warm looking fur-lined jacket on and has not only lost one of his shoes, but his left arm from the elbow down as well. There’s a large chunk of meat missing from his chest, exposing the ribcage. There’s a bullet hole in his back as a nice detail. The model’s face is very skeletal, which I think lets an otherwise lovely model down a bit as there’s no expression on his face. The face is well sculpted, though!

Model #2 – She Was The Sherrif is again really what the name tag says, a female police officer. The model is fine, if a bit boring pose- and face-wise. Bonus points for the empty gun holster and elegant damage, as the poor lady has had her throat torn out some. This one might be the weakest of the 8, though, simply for the bore aspect.

Model #3 – Skewered Vicar is my favourite of all the RC zombies. As the name suggests, he’s a priestly type who has had a large grave marker sized cross rammed through his chest. Apart from that he’s not really sporting other injuries. The vicar is set in a wonderfully vacant and casual zombie pose. The model comes with a hole through the chest and a separate cross. A tiny bit of filing was required to fit the cross in the hole, but the amount of work was minimal.

Model #4 – Chopper/The Beard is a biker type, wearing a Prussian spiked helmet (with a massive spike!) and sunglasses in addition to his normal clothes. This model baffles me a bit. The pose is a bit awkward, which can be explained through zombieness, but the lack of damage and other zombie features make this model a potential survivor as well. There are three teeny tiny holes in his back and two in his front which I assume are bullet holes. However, there is no corresponding damage on the other side, and the holes are small indeed. That leaves this model in a bit of a limbo, as it isn’t really very zombie-like, and the awkward pose eats from his suitability as a survivor. The only skin visible is on his hands, his nose and his cheeks, so he isn’t really easy to zombify by painting either. He competes with #2 for the title of weakest mini.

The first four models. They've been given a black ink wash to bring out the detail

The first four models. They've been given a black ink wash to bring out the detail

Model #5 – Sharkbait is a different story altogether. A gruesome zombie surfer in a pair of shorts, with the entire left half of his upper body missing and what’s left of his ribcage showing. For further evidence of his demise Sharkbait carries what’s left of his half-eaten surfboard. He still has his ankle strap, used to keep a surfer’s board from straying too far if he falls over, on. The remains of the strap are hanging from the board’s end. This kind of loving attention to small detail really makes for a nice mini.

Model #6 – Sister Mary is a zombie nun, which we can never have too many. She’s a lovely sculpt with a torn habit which shows that one of her impressively large breasts has been torn off exposing the ribs. She wears her rosary beads and crucifix around her waist.

Model #7 – Altar Boy adds to the too-slowly growing number of zombie children miniatures available. The sculpt is simple and flat, with the only damage being a missing right arm. Come to think of it, I don’t think I’ve seen a zombie kid sporting a lot of damage. Maybe it’s just the size of the sculpt, or is the subject still a bit taboo? This little altar boy combined with the nun and vicar above should be proof enough that religion simply won’t keep you from being eaten by the undead.

Model #8 – Thin Lizzy is a thin punk rocker zombie girl wearing an oversized – her boyfriend’s, maybe? – leather jacket, a miniskirt and a pair of combat boots. The model is very tall, the size of Sharkbait and standing half a head taller than Sister Mary. The sculpting is nice, with chains hanging from both her belt and her leather jacket and a mohawk hairdo on her head. Oddly enough the skirt only has fold on the backside and not on the front. Could be a fashion thing, can’t really tell. As with model #1, I feel that this model is let down by her skeletal head, which is basically just a skull. Yes, a skull with a mohawk on top. All the comments that apply to #1 apply here as well. Still, I like her!

The last four models

Models #5-8

The overall quality of the RC zombies is excellent. They are crisp, clean sculpts and quality casts with next to no flash. A few models had some tiny moldlines to scrape off, but other than that they were fine out of the box. The zombies are set on cast round bases.

I liked the variety of the sculpts, as well as the nice gender distribution. Three of the eight miniatures were female, one of the five males was a child. There were some nice specialties to stand out from your horde, namely the clerical types, the surfer, the biker and the punk rocker and the cop…basically everyone apart from #1. Sizewise the models fit perfectly with other 28mm manufacturers, being of average build. See the size comparison below for reference.

From left to right: Games Workshop, Recreational Conflict, Copplestone Castings, Mega Miniatures

From left to right: Games Workshop, Recreational Conflict, Copplestone Castings, Mega Miniatures

You can buy the models separately at the price of $2.50 each, or in sets of four for the price of $10, amounting to…waaaait a minute, $2.50 each! Funnily enough, I didn’t even notice this while ordering. While this doesn’t offer you a discount, neither are you stuck with having to buy minis you don’t want to save money on individuals. Shipping costs are very reasonable, too, with overseas shipping for the eight miniatures being only $5.00. For comparison purposes, many US companies charge ~$20 for a similar order, effectively doubling the price of the miniatures.

Overall verdict: I would definitely recommend Recreational Conflict’s zombies to everyone looking to add quality to their 28mm horde. They are fine minis, and have made me consider buying some of RC’s S.P.R.U. agents to fight them.

The miniatures are available directly from Recreational Conflict.

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